Fitzgerald, Edward

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    Introduction
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    Edward, age 95, recalls that the Fitzgerald family arrived from Ireland in 1857. His grandfather went from Ireland to New York, surveying land in PEI. The war paid army officers with land and PEI was divided into Lots. While his grandfather was in New York, his grandfather's brother was in Prince Edward Island and told them about the "cheaply" priced land. So they came and bought land up West in Foxley River and Green Park area. They spent seven weeks crossing the ocean, from Ireland. How the Waterford name came to be. Edward's father was a carpenter, sail-maker shoemaker. A cousin, Norwary Jim Fitzgerald, had farm in North Cape where a lot of ships sunk. Story about Norway Jim Fitzgerald getting caught in the seaweed in his new boots. Escaping the Irish potato famine.
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    Both his grandfather and his grandmother were of the Fitzgerald family (no direct relation). Edward grew up in a large family of 7 boys and 7 girls. None died young. Anne was the youngest to pass away. Both Edward's parents lived to be 88, and his mother was 11 years younger than his father. Discusses Irish family names: Kildare, Tignish, McCue/McHugh, O'Briens
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    Stories about famine. Edward's mother told many story about reef around the shore, while collecting birds eggs. She claimed to discover unseen reefs and finding gold in the shape of animals left by the Spanish.
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    Speaks of the original log house, made of cedar and pines, which is gone. Talks of forrest fires which burnt the soil.
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    Superstitions and ghost stories were cherished. Recalls a story about a handmade clock that struck 10 even though it was flat on its back. His mother's brother (Uncle John) had a vision of his father while working; his father was found at home dead 13 miles from where his son saw the vision of him.
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    Recollects being a student in the country school. One teacher, no grades, just levels of books. Swimming at the shore and eating gooseberries. No school vacation but had three weeks off in October. Death in the community also meant a day off school. When the Potbellied stove broke down they also get off. Recalls lots of exercise, including skating. They attended Church every Sunday. Edward's grandmother spoke Irish Gaelic. The MacDonald family, who came from Cape Breton, spoke Scottish Gaelic and his grandmother could converse in Gaelic with them- the differences were minimal, in accent. Neighbours (Mrs. Constance Mansfield? and Mrs. Breen?) would visit and speak Gaelic.
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    Edward's mother was born in Prince Edward Island. Her family (the McCannon's) came from Ireland. Discusses tea socials and barn dances, playing music, jigs, lancers and frolics. Different kinds of dances and the music that went with it: step-dances, reels, jigs, reels, twirling frolics (spinning wool and the dances that followed). Speaks about how constructing buildings was different and barn raising: with hammers, pins and wooden block foundations. Tells the story of sailor Paddy McCue / McHugh and his dirty shirt. Supreme Court Judge Fitzgerald (Judge Rowan Robert Fitzgerald) in Charlottetown was a family relation.
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    Mentions his nephew George Fitzgerald who has gone to France to study. Discussion on Edward's siblings. Five of Edward's siblings became teachers. His brother Robert was in the Civil Service in Ottawa. Edward was a farmer and taught his nieces and nephews to ride horses. Edward remembers that they went fishing in boats they built themselves. [Tape ends]