Coyle, Maurice

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    Introduction
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    Speaks about the hardships of the early days. There were no hard roads, stumps had to be cleared without the aid of oxen; it took a long it took to clear the land.
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    Mentions relationships between Scots and the Irish. Irish were more fighters than the Scots were. Lots of dance parties with little issue between the Irish and the Scottish.
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    Talks about the diphtheria epidemic that killed many people in the 1870's. In 1875, Maurice's grandmother, two brothers and an only sister died in the same week. Poor survival rate meant many funerals and quickly built coffins.
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    Talks about leather boots. The shoemaker would come to the home to make the boots. Tailors would also come to the home. Every community had a seamstress, dressmakers, shoemakers, Sheep-wool carders, and tailors.
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    Speaks of early settlers bringing furniture and other items from Ireland.
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    Describes the appearance of early settlers. Talks of a hatter (a man who made hats) and the lack of pictures (not many cameras around at the time).
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    Talks about how rough the early cities were, like Charlottetown. Points out the original road which was about 150 years old.
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    Original Acadian settlement had five houses by the river; the Irish also built by the river. They dug wells.
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    Maurice claims you can still see (at time of interview) the basement cellars of these early houses down by the river. Fifty years ago you could see many of these cellars and wells, but not so much now.
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    Recalls homemade bread and homemade butter and living off of beef and eggs.
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    Recalls that livestock (pigs, sheep, cattle) were allowed to roam free into the woods. There weren't that many fences. No problems besides bears in the woods, but after after 30-40 years the bears were all killed off. There were foxes and some wildcats.
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    Speaks about Gaelic speaking of the early settlers. ON his mothers side near Iona there were Gaelic speakers. His grandfather didn't like going with his father to some events because they spoke Gaelic and he couldn't understand.
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    Discusses customs of Irish wakes. Recalls that everyone who came to the wake received a clay pipe that they could take home with them, in memory of the deceased. Wakes could carry on for a couple of nights. Speaks of the "Irish Lament". The person would be in the coffin for the second night of the wake. Speaks of a storyteller, Mr. Trainor.
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    Remembers calling the Scots near Belfast church, "Skenics" and the Irish from Glasgow (such as Pat Duffy) they called "Glass-yeos".
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    SIDE A ends
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    Brief mention of Irish, Scottish, and French relationships.
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    End of Tape