Carragher, Thomas

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    Introduction
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    Discusses Tommy's early life, living in Green Bay, Lot 30, with 6 children in a one bedroom house. His father was a farmer and plasterer. Family helped farming, and they lived off the harvest. They harvested grains by hand. Farm animals; hens, pigs, and sheep for wool. They processed the wool by hand. Remembers the Waterloo kitchen stove, homemade furniture, few radios, and kerosene lamps. Dinner was usually meat or fish and potatoes; everything was from the farm. Recalls washing clothes in spring water, making soap, drying clothes, and ironing.
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    Speaks about entertainment, playing in hay in the summer, snow in the winter, and fishing. Talks about schooling and education. Remembers exams at Christmastime, fire stove in classroom, school subjects, slates, the inkwell, things learned, playing tricks on the teacher and school punishment: switches.
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    Remembers chores: sawing and splitting wood for fire, birch bark, and the iron kettle.
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    Tape break
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    Continues discussion about family evenings: prayer after chores, then play. Remembers dances at age twelve. Beds were tics and straws, with feather pillows. They had homemade towel and they bathed in washtub in winter, and outside in summer. Remembers the Exhibition in Charlottetown. They paid twenty five cents to travel from North Wiltshire Station to Charlottetown. Recalls that the horse pulled the Merry-Go-Round.
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    The community doctor was Doctor Murchison, and the undertaker was Mr. P.D. Hagan. Wakes were in the house. They would wash the deceased and place them in the casket. There was no embalming. Wakes lasted two or three nights.
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    Speaks about entertainment: dances, relationships/courtships, quilting bees, hook and match, rug hooking, big frolic, making frames, patch making, and homemade woven blankets.
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    Tommy tells the story about signing up for the First Wold War. Recalls buying a new suit for ten dollars (he had red clay still on his boots). He was recruited in Bangor Maine, while staying with his sister. He was on his way with friends to watch a silent picture shows, such as Charlie Chaplin, when a recruiter asked him to join the war. He asked how much a soldier was paid. He was told "a dollar five a day". He lied about his age and signed up. He was promised a leave to see his mother in Prince Edward Island before going oversees. Recalls a a smallpox quarantine. He trained for four months at Aldershot Military Camp in Nova Scotia and asked for his leave home, but was told that all leaves were cancelled. They needed more fighters in the war. They left from Halifax harbour with all their supplies. Recalls his time on the ship. They were almost torpedoed off the coast of Ireland. Tommy recalls the events of war he participated in, in England and in France. He was part of the 112 Nova Scotia Battalion. Tommy received two war medals. Recalls being in France on November 11, 1918 and the great celebration. Tells the story of getting back home to Canada after the war ended: from Bordeaux France, to Southampton England to Camp [Kinmel?] in Wales (30,000 men in that camp). Found out they were taking the Americans home first and that angered the Canadian soldiers; the American showed up last and were going home first. Tommy finally landed in Halifax on April 13th and got home to Prince Edward Island on April 19th [1919].
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    Speaks of his marriage to Stella Flood, a girl he went to school with. They started dating in April and they were married on June 18th. Stella turned 18 in December after they married. On the wedding day they drove an old Model-T car and had a big dinner in Bonshaw at a Hotel. They drove to Victoria, Kelly's Cross and back home. Not many cars around at that time. Remembers their shivaree: lots fiddlers, organ, dancing, supper, whiskey, and homemade beer. Explains what a shivaree was. They had eight children, seven sons and one daughter: Helen, Frank, Eugene, Leo, Ralph, Louis, George, and Gerry. Tommy has 39 grandchildren, and 23 great grandchildren with "two in the oven".