Interviewees

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Adelaide Mae Hamm
Adelaide Mae Hamm
Adelaide Mae Hamm was born and raised on her family's farm in Bunbury, Prince Edward Island. As a young woman she trained as a seamstress in Charlottetown. Adelaide had two brothers who fought in World War I at Vimy Ridge She lived most of her long life as a single woman on the family farm, never marrying, before dying at the age of 101 at the Atlantic Baptist Nursing Home on February 6th, 2004.
Agnes Sheehan
Agnes Sheehan
Mary Agnes Sheehan was born on May 25th, 1908 in Bear River, Prince Edward Island. She attended school in the Bear River community and at St. Mary's Convent in Souris. She was forced to leave school in 1925 when her father passed away in order to help her mother operate the family farm. In 1928 she married Hugh Sheehan of Bear River and he helped them operate the farm until her mother passed away later that year. After the death of her mother they closed the farm and moved to Waterville, Maine. However, the urge to farm soon pulled them back to Prince Edward Island where they reopened the family farm and raised 13 children there. During her life she was a member of the St. Alexis Parish, and a firm believer in St. Ann de Beaupre. She made her first of 21 visits to the St. Ann de Beaupre shrine in Quebec in 1975. Mary died on December 9th, 2000 at the age of 92. At the time of her death she was the oldest member of the Bear River community. She was predeceased by her husband Hugh, was the mother of 13 children, grandmother of 45 children, and great grandmother of 34 children. She was remembered as being very active in her community, and a member of the Bear River Women's Institute, Catholic Women's League, and was instrumental in organizing gatherings and benefits for Bear River community members.
Arthur 'Herb' Arbuckle
Arthur 'Herb' Arbuckle
Arthur "Herb" Arbuckle was born in Ponds, Pictou County, Nova Scotia. He inherited the name "Herb" from his father in the Scottish naming tradition. Athurt lived his entire life as a fisherman in Malignant Cove near Antigonish. He was one of the last commercial Atlantic salmon fishermen in all of Nova Scotia.
Arthur Vincent "Blueberry" Doyle
Arthur Vincent "Blueberry" Doyle
Arthur Vincent "Blueberry" Doyle was a Prince Edward Island resident from the Mt. Stewart area. He worked for 30 years with the Island firm C.M. McLean where he worked diligently to establish national and worldwide export markets for blueberries, strawberries, and seed potatoes. His success in getting the commercial blueberry industries of Prince Edward Island and later Nova Scotia off the ground earned him the Governor General Award for his contributions to his country and community. Arthur was also a World War II veteran who served overseas. Upon his retirement he kept busy with a multitude of volunteer projects such as tracking the evolution of Island industries in his spare time. Arthur Doyle died at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital on March 27th at the age of 87. He was predeceased by his wife Mary G. Doyle and was the father of 3 children, and had 6 grandchildren.
Bob Jenkins
Bob Jenkins
Bob Jenkins spent his adult life in Kington, in the Herefordshire region of England. He worked as a historian and a newspaper columnist for English newspapers like the Hereford Times and Western Mail and he owned his own book shop in the area called 'Arrow Books'.
Borden Mooney
Borden Mooney
Borden Philip Mooney was born in 1910 on Prince Edward Island. He lived his adult life in Peakes Station where he worked as a carpenter until his retirement. Borden's passion in life was singing. He joined St. Theresa's Parish Choir in 1927 at the age of 17, because his father was the organist. It soon became a staple in his life, and he sang for over 60 years with the choir despite never having formal musical training. In addition to singing with the Parish, he also performed in over 30 plays that they performed across Prince Edward Island. Borden died at the Kings County Memorial Hospital in Montague on May 21st, 1997 at the age of 87.
Captain Tom Trenholm
Captain Tom Trenholm
Tom Trenholm was born in Wallace, Nova Scotia on March 8th, 1910. He was the son of Captain William Trenholm who was a successful schooner captain, once owning seven schooners himself. Tom was born into a family of seafaring men and like his brothers he was destined for the same life. It did not take long for Tom as he was made captain of his own schooner at the age of 17. It was around that age that Tom married his wife of over 75 years, Mary, who quickly became his shipmate. The two of them ran Tom's schooner, the 'Nellie Dixon', on their own. They moved to Georgetown, Prince Edward Island in 1937 where they lived together for 20 years. During World War II Tom and Mary worked all throughout the conflict hauling coal from North Sydney, Nova Scotia to the shores of Newfoundland in the Nellie Dixon. In honour of their dangerous work they are both recognized by the government as Merchant Mariners who helped in the war effort. Tom Trenholm now lives with Mary in Murray Harbour in their home of over 50 years. At the time of writing (2010) they have been married for over 75 years and have two children. Tom is officially retired from the sea, but he still keeps busy at the age of 100. He has built upwards of 60 fishing boats in his retirement, plays the fiddle, and enjoys regaling people with tales of his seafaring days. Tom is one of the last remaining schooner captains in Canada and still finds time to head out to sea with Mary.
Donald Stewart MacNeil
Donald Stewart MacNeil
Donald Stewart MacNeil was born in Little Harbour on November 20th, 1920. He received his education at New Glasgow High School and Dalhousie University before he went overseas to serve with the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War II. In honour of his service he was awarded the Air Force Flying Cross. Upon returning home from the war he kept very busy with varied work. He formed the Gulf Flying Service to provide local and regional service, such as mail service to Pictou Island. He was employed for many years with Fraser and Hoyt Insurance and Real Estate. He served as the commanding officer and flying instructor of Air Cadet Squadron no. 397 of Trenton for 17 years. In addition to his employment he was also an active personality in the community. He was a member of the Air Force Club, the Royal Canadian Legion, the New Glasgow City Club, a former President of the Saint Andrews Society, and was one of the founding members of the Junior Braemar which later became known as the Festival of Tartans. Donald passed away in Aberdeen Regional Hospital on March 24th, 2006. He was the husband of Mardy MacNeil and the father of two sons and grandfather of two. The Royal Canadian Legion branch #34 and the Royal Canadian Air Force Association were on hand at the funeral to pay respects.
Eddie Clay
Eddie Clay
Edwin "Eddy" Franklin Clay was born in Bridgetown, Prince Edward Island in 1926. He spent his life there working as a farmer, and also spent time working at Matthew and McLean's local general store. Edwin died at the Atlantic Baptist Nursing Home in Charlottetown on February 25th, 2009 at the age of 83.
Edmund Gill
Edmund Gill
Edmund Gill was born and raised in Elliotvale, Prince Edward Island. He was the second youngest in a home that had up to 21 children residing there at any one time. Edmund was the son of John Thomas Gill who was a well known blacksmith and carriage maker on Prince Edward Island and apprenticed many up and comers in his trade. During his youth Edmund worked with his brothers alongside their father at the family shop repairing wagons, making school desks, and any odd job that came their way. In his adult life Edmund primarily worked as a farmer on Prince Edward Island. He and his brothers also inherited a love of old stories, and a belief in the supernatural, from their father.
Eric Irving 'Tiger' Mackie
Eric Irving 'Tiger' Mackie
"Eric Irving 'Tiger' Mackie was born on March 17th, 1914 on Prince Edward Island. He grew up in the Stanley Bridge and Southport area on his families farm. He began playing hockey at a very young age and had success with the sport early. He was a member of the 1932 Maritime Champion Charlottetown Abbies team and thus began a 30 year professional hockey career that spanned both Canada and the United States. Tiger Mackie tried out for the Boston Bruins in 1935 but failed to make the team, however he did play pro hockey in Pittsburgh, Detroit, Quebec, and Glace Bay before returning to his 'adopted home' of Port Hawkesbury and playing locally. Tiger Mackie settled in Port Hawkesbury and lived much of his life there. Early on he worked developing installations of artificial ice plants and cooling systems for local rinks and was instrumental in creating Port Hawkesbury's first ice rink. He later became president of the Strait Area Minor Hockey Association and spent most of his years coaching local teams while working as a welder with Stora Forest Industries. Tiger Mackie played hockey well into his 80's and died in Port Hawkesbury in 2003 at the age of 89. He was inducted into the Port Hawkesbury Sports Wall of Fame as a builder due to his work in the creation of the areas first hockey rink. Tiger had three children, 10 grandchildren, and 13 great grandchildren upon his death and was predeceased by his wife Elsie. The annual 'Tiger Mackie Tournament' has been run in his honour for over thirty years at Port Hawkesbury and celebrates his dedication and commitment to the game. of Port Hawkesbury and playing locally."
Frank Whelan
Frank Whelan
Frank Whelan lived his life on Prince Edward Island in the town of New Zealand where he ran a general store. He had a number of additional odd jobs and occupations that kept him busy; He bought and shipped blueberries around by train, served as an Alter Boy (occasionally serving mass in a nearby haunted house), and he was a railway section worker who looked after the tracks by keeping them clear of snow, debris, etc. He died August 30th, 1999.

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