Duffy, Ethel

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    Introduction
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    Begins talking about Irish ancestors from County Monaghan; some ancestors were from Seskinore, Ireland. Speaks briefly about famine. Ethel's grandmother was eight years old when they came from Charlottetown to their land Maplewood (what's now called Kelly's Cross). Ethel's grandparents were John Duffy and Mary McKenna. They walked from Charlottetown to Kelly's Cross area to claim their land. John died in his 80's in 1903 and Mary died in 1912. They were primarily farmers.
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    All heirlooms from Ireland came on the ship, but she does recall the name of the ship. The Ship would come to Charlottetown, it was only the port they used then.
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    The house built by original settlers burnt a few years earlier.
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    The settlers livelihood was farming.
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    Traces her family tree far as her grandparents. Her grandfather was John Duffy, and his mother was a McNaughton. Four brothers came to PEI. John and James settled near each other in Maplewood. Uncle James was the first man to have white bread.
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    Ethel tells a story about her grandfather (John Duffy) who lost a horse and no other horse to help him clear land in the Spring. The neighbours wanted to take up a collection to help him get a horse, but John said "no", he could get up earlier and work harder and he'd be fine. From this the neighbour's said, "The Duffy's don't know how to make a poor mouth", meaning "The Duffy's don't know how to complain". Ethel has taken this as a proverb for herself.
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    Speaks about Cardinal McGuigan, grandson of Charlie Monaghan, son of his daughter Annie Monaghan. He was brilliant, learned French quickly and was able to work in the French parishes. He was secretary to Bishop O'Leary and followed him when he transferred out West (Edmonton). [James C.] Cardinal McGuigan became a bishop in Toronto and later an Archbishop, youngest in the world, and then a Cardinal.
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    Discusses the early days. Making things out of wood. Wonders where pane of glass came from. Recalls heating sticks in the oven, wrapping them, and bring them into bed to keep warm. She never heard anyone complaining of the hardships of the early days, everyone was satisfied and happy to be free from the famine.
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    Centre of everything was the church; after Mass they'd make evening plans which included fiddling and dancing. Hard work during the week, doing everything by hand using rakes, hammer and sickles and scythes.
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    Speaks about ceilidh's. [Poor sound quality: ruffling].
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    [Poor sound quality: ruffling]. Speaks about the institutions in the community: church and rural schools. Schools at Maplewood, Kelly's Cross, Brookvale, South Melville, Westmoreland.
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    Famous Duffy's? Charles Gavan Duffy, an Irish orator, but not directly to her. Speaks about one grandfather who talked of the importance of paying the bills. Ruffling still going on.
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    Speaks of the Trainor family and ceilidhs. The Trainor's son (John) was a cobbler (shoemaker) who went to Boston or F? River. Later he was educated by a priest, married the priest's sister and became Mayor of the town. Talks about the shoes in those days. Ethel briefly mentions that her son died in Colorado. Recalls a story of her good friend Mrs. Trainor and the last pair of shoes Johnny made for her- fine calfskin shoes. All the shoes had copper toes and there were no rubber boots, just good stout shoes.
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    Discusses prosperous Prince Edward Islanders who went away to the United States and came back in the summer. Wonders why people of the "same stock" would look down on each other.
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    Speaks about the "brainy" Curley family from Brookvale. Also mentions the Monaghan's, McDonald's and Kelly's and local nicknames: Black Johnny, White Johnny and Peter the Great. Talks of Charlie Monaghan and his brother who was married to a woman called "Rosie". Wonders what happened to everyone and their land.
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    Discusses what happened to John Duffy's two sons and two daughters. They sold the property to a French family, now the only people in Maplewood who are French descent. Speaks of the original Trainor, and other local Trainor family members. The Trainor's were good farmers and gardiners. [Conversation is cut off].
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    SIDE A ends
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    Introduction
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    Discusses the Shreenan's in Kinkora and their family connection. Where he lived and grew up. Ethel's mother's side of the family.
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    Speaks of the Johnson's family. The Johnson daughters married to John Trainor (Kate Johnston) Theodore McKeever (Kinkora Corner), McAvin (Kelly's Cross), Murray (Riverton), Hagen (Kelly's Cross). Johnny Johnson. There were many double marriages, siblings marrying siblings. Ernest Deighan (Ethel's cousin) married a Johnson and had twenty children (one killed in Yellowknife or Whitehorse); one of the girls was a Sister in Summerside; Ethel married a Pendergast near Kensington.
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    Discusses the Shreenan family: James (Jimmy/Jim) Shreenan, his daughter was Alice, (Ethel's grandmother) who was married to a Whalen (therefore Ethel's mother was a Whelan). Mary Whelan married a Duffy (Ethel's mother). Mary Whelan's sister, Susan was married to a Deighan, her sister Alice was married to an Farrell (from Kelly's Cross who later lived in Souris), and a sister Lavinia, Alice? married to Patsy Conway (Kelly's Cross/Green Road).
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    These families all had the same kind of life, very poor. They all had to work very and no one had any advantage over another. Physical strength was the only advantage.
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    Speaks about the Irish Americans and their resent towards their treatment. Recalls that Cardinal O'Connell made speeches in Boston about Irish persecution. The only person who held out a hand to them was the priest, which is why the Irish are so grateful of the church.
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    Ethel speaks about English-Irish relations through the lens of English History books. Did not hear of English-Irish issues until she left Kelly's Cross. Took Scotch Presbyterians into Ireland to take some of the land. Understands how the Irish want their own country with their own laws and able to govern themselves.
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    Discuss relationship customs - what to do if a couple wanted to get marry. Consequences. It happened to a McKenna girl who married a McAvin. Wakes were important. Houses were to full of food at the wakes. They stayed all night and continued to eat.
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    Story of Mr. [James] Flood (married to a [Hannah] Monaghan). His daughter was married to a Nantes, and Nantes died suddenly. Mr. Flood said, "she thinks he's in heaven. Ha. He'll never see it". Recalls story about wondering whose child the baby was, with the father gone to New Brunswick so often.
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    Retells the story of Ethel's Grandfather Duffy and his proposal to Ethel's grandmother [Mary McKenna]: it was the custom for the groom to buy enough material for a wedding dress and then ask the family for their daughters hand in marriage. He asked one set of parents (the McKenna's) but they said she was too young. So he asked a different family to marry their daughter. The McKenna's decided they made a mistake in refusing and let him know. So he got the material back from the second family in order to marry the first girl [Mary McKenna, Ethel's grandmother]. Suitors would have to ask the father to court his daughters; sometimes they would allow one daughter but not the other.
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    Unless it was muscular work, the Irish men were "useless". Ethel says, "They couldn't make a cup of tea for themselves. Honestly they were the most useless men... [excpet for].... good, hard muscular work... It was a man's world, alright. There was no women's lib". Weddings would sometimes last two weeks with lots of dancing, lots of food. Uncle John Shreenan (married to a Johnston) had a stormy winter wedding.
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    No movies, no tv's, but lots of weddings and wakes. Talks about priests being a big factor in their life.
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    How her parents came to meet: Ethel's parents lived across the street from each other. She discussed her oldest uncle [Michael Duffy's] relationship with Mary Ellen Stordy. Jimmy Duffy also courted a Stordy girl. The Duffy women did not like the Stordy girls and so they broke up the matches. Michael Duffy remained unmarried until he was quite old. Jimmy Duffy ended up marrying another and had no children. In the next generation Ethel's sister, Mary, married a Stordy [John Anthony Stordy]. Discusses a Trainor/Stordy/Shreenan connection. [tape cuts off]
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    SIDE B Tape 1 ends
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    Tape two Side A begins
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    lntroduction
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    Begins telling story about two people killed in a thunderstorm on a Sunday afternoon in July, 1902. At home of John Duffy... his daughter and husband came for the afternoon. Daughter was Mrs.Tom Monaghan. Tom Monaghan and a neighbour (a 19 year old Trainor) died. Mary would marry again. Story of Owen and Tom Trainor.
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    Tape two side a ends