Kelly, Loretta and Joseph Kelly

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    Introduction
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    Speaks of his first fiddle he bought for five dollars (which had the Stradivarius stamp on it). Joe learned the fiddle from brother John. John played at dances. Usually paid ten cents, but recalls one night when he was paid nine dollars. Story of how Joe got his second fiddle. The fiddle he has now he purchased a few years ago. Recalls early songs: Lord MacDonald's Reel, Fisher's Hornpipe, Irish Eyes are Smiling. Joe has played for 83 years.
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    Joseph, age 93, plays a waltz (from Cape Breton) on his fiddle, and an unnamed song that Joe wrote, and another waltz and the song "Speed the Plough".
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    Talks about growing flax, scutching flax, spinning thread, looms, making clothing and towels and tablecloths. Recalls that everything they wore was handmade and all food was homegrown. Speaks of farming and winter crops; buckwheat and wheat. Discusses blacksmith shops, tailor shops, and trading instead of money.
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    Talks about Father Duffy, born in Ireland. Relates stories of his time a priest in in Newfoundland. Speaks about Father Duffy's Well in Newfoundland and the belief in its curing powers. When he came to Prince Edward Island he was a priest for three parishes: Kinkora, Kelly's Cross, and Lot 65. Father Duffy died of pneumonia in 1840 and he asked to be buried in Kelly's Cross in front of the Church so people would pray for his soul as they passed his grave. When they built the new church, they raised Father Duffy's remains and reburied him in 1900. His body had not decayed. Joe had seen his remains and said he looked the same, "like a wax doll". Loretta's father [James Ronald Monaghan] and Joe's older brother was a pallbearer when Father Duffy was reburied. Speaks of protecting Father Duffy's current gravesite. Discusses the history of the Kelly's Cross graveyard.
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    Tells the story of the naming the corner Kelly's Cross because there was a Kelly on every road: Tommy Kelly, Edward Kelly, Jim Kelly, Patrick Kelly. The Old South Melville road, all the people were called Desablers, now the area of DeSable.